Steroid era players hall fame

Which made Canseco’s second benefactor — Mike Wallace — all the more important. John Hamlin, a producer at 60 Minutes , had gotten a tip about Canseco’s book from a friend at another network. (The friend couldn’t act on it because his employer was a Major League Baseball rights holder.) Hamlin began calling baseball people and confirming the details. Almost no one would talk on the record, but they suggested that Canseco’s account was true. One of the few allegations Hamlin couldn’t verify was Canseco’s insistence that Roger Clemens was juicing.

8. Don Mattingly: Mattingly case is simply one of "what might have been." He was a remarkable player during his prime, but back injuries hit him in his late 20s, and after that he just didn't have the power bat you want in a first baseman, and he retired at 34. During his first six seasons as a regular, Mattingly hit .327/.372/.530 with an annual average of 27 homers, 114 RBIs, 203 hits and -- get this -- 34 strikeouts. He won five Gold Gloves during those years, won one MVP award and finished in the top 10 of the voting three other times. He had WAR in those seasons, but just the rest of this career.

The Mitchell Report also stated that interviews were requested of five MLB players who had spoken out publicly on the steroid issue. Of these players, only one, Frank Thomas , was willing to be interviewed. The Mitchell Report stated that there was no evidence that any of these five had used performance-enhancing drugs. Curt Schilling , one of the four players who declined to interview with Mitchell, explained that he denied Mitchell's request because he "would have nothing to offer" Mitchell's investigation "other than personal opinion and hypotheticals." [6]

Eddie Mathews is causing us some major problems here. Here’s why: Mathews is not on our list. The writers did not vote him in until his fifth ballot — that means he clearly falls way, way, way below our standard of entry. But Mathews is the highest-rated comp on three of our remaining players: Mike Schmidt (a 920 similarity score), George Brett (an 854 similarity score) and Mickey Mantle (also an 854 similarity — shouldn’t this make Brett and Mantle, like identical twins?). This is problematic because we do not want Eddie Mathews fans shouting about how he belongs in our Hall when we so clearly know he does not. So … Schmidt and Brett are out. We hate to lose ’em — this means we will not have a third baseman in our Hall. But you know, third base is kind of a minor position anyway. If they could play defense, they’d be shortstops, right?

Steroid era players hall fame

steroid era players hall fame

Eddie Mathews is causing us some major problems here. Here’s why: Mathews is not on our list. The writers did not vote him in until his fifth ballot — that means he clearly falls way, way, way below our standard of entry. But Mathews is the highest-rated comp on three of our remaining players: Mike Schmidt (a 920 similarity score), George Brett (an 854 similarity score) and Mickey Mantle (also an 854 similarity — shouldn’t this make Brett and Mantle, like identical twins?). This is problematic because we do not want Eddie Mathews fans shouting about how he belongs in our Hall when we so clearly know he does not. So … Schmidt and Brett are out. We hate to lose ’em — this means we will not have a third baseman in our Hall. But you know, third base is kind of a minor position anyway. If they could play defense, they’d be shortstops, right?

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