Steroids for feline lymphoma

As with all medications, it is helpful for some cats and not with others. This may also be due to the fact that budesonide must come into contact with the section of the intestines where there is inflammation, and “As most budesonide is released in the terminal ileum, it will have its best results in Crohn’s disease [IBD] limited to the terminal ileum.” [This is the last section of the intestines just before the colon]. If the inflammation is in a different section or area of the intestines, it may not be effective.  MedicineNet:
http:///crohns_disease/

Surgery:   Surgical removal remains the best option in providing a cure for certain types of cancer in cases where a solitary tumor is present with no associated metastasis. During removal the surgeon will strive to obtain 3 cm margins in all directions of the tumor. This results in a large incision in relationship to the size of the tumor removed. In general the perimeter of the tumor contains the most aggressive cells, as they are the ones responsible for spreading the cancer to associated healthy tissues and increasing its size. To ensure that clean margins are obtained all removed masses should be submitted for histopathology. In cases where cancer cells are still present along the periphery, another surgery should be performed promptly or radiation or chemotherapy therapy should be instituted to reduce its ability to spread. In cases where masses do return they often are more aggressive than the initial tumor because as stated above the more aggressive cells at the periphery are what were left behind.

A: To the best of my knowledge there is not a scientifically proven method of clearing the feline leukemia virus from infected cats using immunotherapy. That may not be what you Vet is referring to by "success" in treatment, though. We have a number of cats who live reasonably long and healthy lives despite infection with feline leukemia virus. I count the treatment of them as successful, despite the fact that in the end they may die from complications of the disease. This may also be what your Veterinarian is referring to. If he is referring to actually clearing the virus from these cats, he is aware of a treatment I am unaware of, or else he is somehow adding up the natural cases of resistance, cases of sequestration of the virus in areas that result in subsequent negative tests and other complicating factors of testing and coming up with a higher clearance rate than is actually happening. There have been conflicting studies on a couple of therapies for feline leukemia virus using Staph protein A (one claimed benefit, one didn't), Immunoregulin (at this point, I think that the studies overwhelmingly support no success in treatment) and interferon. There have been good anecdotal reports of the helpfulness of interferon in treatment of cats ill with this disease but no reports of it actually clearing the virus under controlled conditions, at least to the best of my knowledge. We generally try to use good supportive care -- good quality diet, reduction of as much stress as possible, early aggressive treatment of any illness and keeping the cats indoors (both for their benefit and the benefit of cats they might expose to the virus). Many cats live reasonably normal lives for quite some time despite infection with this virus under these conditions. The vaccines are about 85% effective in preventing infection with feline leukemia virus. It would be worthwhile to vaccinate your female cat if she will remain exposed to your male cat and she is negative on testing. I hate to disagree with you vet and I really do hope that he knows something I don't in this case. Good luck with this.

Long-term use has the risk of creating more permanent and severe damage. Some high dose, long-term side effects include increased incidence of infections, poor hair coat and skin, immunosuppression , diabetes mellitus , adrenal suppression, and liver problems. The potential problems can be severe, however, it must be stressed that these side effects are dose dependent. Despite the potential side effects, steroids can be used effectively and safely, if a careful dosage schedule is followed. Still, because of the availability of safer yet effective therapies, steroid use is reserved until all other treatment options have been exhausted. Several studies have shown that if fatty acids and antihistamines are used concurrently with steroids that the amount of steroids needed to offer relief is greatly reduced.

Steroids for feline lymphoma

steroids for feline lymphoma

Long-term use has the risk of creating more permanent and severe damage. Some high dose, long-term side effects include increased incidence of infections, poor hair coat and skin, immunosuppression , diabetes mellitus , adrenal suppression, and liver problems. The potential problems can be severe, however, it must be stressed that these side effects are dose dependent. Despite the potential side effects, steroids can be used effectively and safely, if a careful dosage schedule is followed. Still, because of the availability of safer yet effective therapies, steroid use is reserved until all other treatment options have been exhausted. Several studies have shown that if fatty acids and antihistamines are used concurrently with steroids that the amount of steroids needed to offer relief is greatly reduced.

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